1. 07:36 17th Jan 2014

    Notes: 30

    Reblogged from inthenoosphere

    Cities are technological artifacts, the largest technology we make. Their impact is out of proportion to the number of humans living in them.
    — Kevin Kelly (via inthenoosphere)
     
  2. 12:02 20th Dec 2013

    Notes: 99

    Reblogged from inthenoosphere

    In the network society, the space of flows dissolves time by disordering the sequence of events and making them simultaneous in the communication networks, thus installing society in structural ephemerality: being cancels becoming.
    — Manuel Castells (via inthenoosphere)
     
  3. 10:41 10th Sep 2013

    Notes: 122

    Reblogged from miredingravity

    There is no way to understand cities well without using the skills and insights of a large variety of disciplines: geography, economics, psychology, sociology, law, anthropology, political science, geology, ecology, and the humanities.
    — 

    Corinne Lathrop Gilb (1975)

    A message for techno enthusiasts of smart cities

    (via humanscalecities)

    (Source: rootsandroutes)

     
  4. 05:51 15th Jul 2013

    Notes: 2

    image: Download

    Emily Fischer’s Custom Quilts Are Hand-Stitched Digital Cartography

For the custom pieces, Fischer must find a density of data that conforms to “Amish rules of quilting” which requires a stitch roughly every two inches. “I spend a lot of time researching each project to express that density, something beyond what is shown via Google. The stitches can be anything: from topographic contours in the California hills, historic property lines in Brooklyn Heights, ski trails in Aspen, the abstract patterns of nautical charts in Penobscot Bay.” All of this feeds into Haptic Lab’s larger purpose, “to explore the tactile sense, to ground our lives in the physical world and the physical space of our bodies.

[via] FastCoDesign

    Emily Fischer’s Custom Quilts Are Hand-Stitched Digital Cartography

    For the custom pieces, Fischer must find a density of data that conforms to “Amish rules of quilting” which requires a stitch roughly every two inches. “I spend a lot of time researching each project to express that density, something beyond what is shown via Google. The stitches can be anything: from topographic contours in the California hills, historic property lines in Brooklyn Heights, ski trails in Aspen, the abstract patterns of nautical charts in Penobscot Bay.” All of this feeds into Haptic Lab’s larger purpose, “to explore the tactile sense, to ground our lives in the physical world and the physical space of our bodies.

    [via] FastCoDesign

     
  5. 01:54

    Notes: 43

    Reblogged from urbanplannerholic

    urbanrelationsinfo:

    New Tool Facilitates Stunning City Comparisons

    The creator of the TED conference has teamed up with Esri to develop an innovative interactive exhibit and online mapping tool to compare 16 global cities along 16 data points, including: population density, open space, and traffic.

    Richard Saul Wurman, the creator of the TED conference, has been interested in being able to compare cities at the same scale for more than 50 years. But only recently was he able to create a means to effectively, and attractively, display comparative patterns. 

    Wurman, Jon Kamen of Radical Media, and Esri president Jack Dangermond, have together created the Urban Observatory, “an immersive exhibit featuring standardized comparative data on over 16 cities. Zoom in on one city map and other cities will simultaneously zoom in at the same scale, making it possible to compare data on traffic density, vegetation, residential land use, and so on,” says Ariel Schwartz.

    "The Observatory features 16 data sets in five categories: work, movement, people, public, and systems. ‘It’s shocking that it hasn’t been done 40 years ago, 50 years ago,’ says Wurman."

     
  6. Spatial modelling is a process with a circle of induction and deduction. The inductive process results in a theory generated by sufficient amount of empirical data (statistical data), while the deductive process can be understood as a test to the theory that in return adds complexity to the theory.
    — [Citation] A. Van Nes and S. ZhaoHui, “Network Typology, Junction Typology and Spatial Configuration and Their Impacts on Street Vitality in Singapore,” in 7th International Space Syntax Symposium, 2009, pp. 1–11.
     
  7. 15:13 1st May 2013

    Notes: 8

    image: Download

    Adjacency GraphAn Abstract Representation of Spatial Relationships
The provinces of Netherlands, it’s adjacency graph representation and a rectangular population cartogram.
[Citation] M. de Berg, E. Mumford, and B. Speckmann, “On rectilinear duals for vertex-weighted plane graphs,” Discrete Mathematics, vol. 309, no. 7, pp. 1794–1812, Apr. 2009.

    Adjacency Graph
    An Abstract Representation of Spatial Relationships

    The provinces of Netherlands, it’s adjacency graph representation and a rectangular population cartogram.

    [Citation] M. de Berg, E. Mumford, and B. Speckmann, “On rectilinear duals for vertex-weighted plane graphs,” Discrete Mathematics, vol. 309, no. 7, pp. 1794–1812, Apr. 2009.

     
  8. 08:47 27th Apr 2013

    Notes: 11

    image: Download

    WRIGHT, A Constraint Based Spatial Layout System
WRIGHT formulates the problems of generating two dimensional layouts consisting of rectangular design units as a Boolean constraint satisfaction problem. It formulates layout problems as constrained optimisation problems, and solves them by constrained heuristic search effective in the design of two dimensional layout configurations such as site plans, floor plans, facility layouts and the arrangement of equipment in rooms. In spatial layout, topological relations such as adjacency, alignment, grouping, and properties such as shape, dimension, distance, and other functions of spatial arrangement are principal concern. Spatial layout is a design task. It is an important aspect of architectural design and other fields that deal with physical design.
[Citation] Baykan, C. A. and Fox, M. S., WRIGHT: a constraint based spatial layout system. In Artificial intelligence in engineering design (Volume I), Christopher Tong and Duvvuru Sriram (Eds.). Academic Press Professional, Inc., 1992, San Diego, CA, USA 395-432.

    WRIGHT, A Constraint Based Spatial Layout System

    WRIGHT formulates the problems of generating two dimensional layouts consisting of rectangular design units as a Boolean constraint satisfaction problem. It formulates layout problems as constrained optimisation problems, and solves them by constrained heuristic search effective in the design of two dimensional layout configurations such as site plans, floor plans, facility layouts and the arrangement of equipment in rooms. In spatial layout, topological relations such as adjacency, alignment, grouping, and properties such as shape, dimension, distance, and other functions of spatial arrangement are principal concern. Spatial layout is a design task. It is an important aspect of architectural design and other fields that deal with physical design.

    [Citation] Baykan, C. A. and Fox, M. S., WRIGHT: a constraint based spatial layout system. In Artificial intelligence in engineering design (Volume I), Christopher Tong and Duvvuru Sriram (Eds.). Academic Press Professional, Inc., 1992, San Diego, CA, USA 395-432.

     
  9. The way sociologists and anthropologists study modern society has changed dramatically in recent years. One of the major advances has been the ability to study human behaviour by mining the massive databases from technologies such as mobile phones and social media, such as Twitter. These technologies provide a firehose of near real-time data about people’s ideas, location and even their feelings.

    That’s enabled entirely new insight into the way society behaves. Morgan Frank and pals at the University of Vermont take this work a step further by analysing how the sentiments people express over Twitter change as they move further afield. The conclusion? The further away we are, the happier we become, as measured by the sentiments of our Tweets.

    [Citation] M. R. Frank, L. Mitchell, P. S. Dodds, and C. M. Danforth, “Happiness and the Patterns of Life: A Study of Geolocated Tweets,” arXiv preprint arXiv:1304.1296, 2013.

    (Source: technologyreview.com)

     
  10. 07:59 19th Apr 2013

    Notes: 90

    Reblogged from notational

    Unfold a street map.. place a glass, rim down any where on the map, draw around it’s edge. Pick up the map, go out into the city and walk the circle, keeping as close as you can to the curve. Record the experience as you go, in what ever medium you favour: film, photograph, manuscript, tape. Catch the textural run-off of the streets; the graffiti, the branded litter, the snatches of conversation. Cut for sign. Log the data-stream. Be alert to the happenstance of metaphors, watch for visual rhymes, coincidences, analogies, family resemblances, the changing moods of the street. Complete the circle, and the record ends. Walking makes for content: footage for footage.
    — Robert MacFarlane, A Road of One’s Own (via tsparks) (via reckon, tsparks) (via notational)